Jody Michael

smartgirlsattheparty:

pulitzercenter:

“A lot of us hoped that once we had the Internet we might have more information about the world, but now we may be fooling ourselves to think we have an accurate picture of Africa when in fact it is no more accurate than it was before the Internet age.” — Ethan Zuckerman to Pulitzer Center grantee Amy Maxmen in this piece. What are your thoughts?

Images by Pulitzer Center grantee Amy Maxmen. Mali, 2013. Read more here.

Learn more, click the link. It’s worth reading. 

pulitzercenter:

The buckle of the Rust Belt, Youngstown, Ohio, is getting a shining with shale gas. But will the shale gas boom end any differently for the town than the steel bust? Read the whole story from Pulitzer Center grantee Dimiter Kenarov.
Don’t miss Kenarov’s reporting on shale gas in Poland, Pennsylvania and Ohio, which was funded by the Pulitzer Center and Calkins Media, publishers of Shalereporter.com.

pulitzercenter:

The buckle of the Rust Belt, Youngstown, Ohio, is getting a shining with shale gas. But will the shale gas boom end any differently for the town than the steel bust? Read the whole story from Pulitzer Center grantee Dimiter Kenarov.

Don’t miss Kenarov’s reporting on shale gas in Poland, Pennsylvania and Ohio, which was funded by the Pulitzer Center and Calkins Media, publishers of Shalereporter.com.


In the slums of Kampala, the city’s poorest residents are particularly vulnerable. Waiting in long lines at clinics takes up valuable time, and top-end malaria cures are expensive. So when a malarial fever strikes, many search for cures in neighborhood drugstores, where the fakes are frequently found.

Fake drugs flood East African markets - The Washington Post
(Photo by Kathleen E. McLaughlin/Pulitzer Center)

In the slums of Kampala, the city’s poorest residents are particularly vulnerable. Waiting in long lines at clinics takes up valuable time, and top-end malaria cures are expensive. So when a malarial fever strikes, many search for cures in neighborhood drugstores, where the fakes are frequently found.

Fake drugs flood East African markets - The Washington Post

(Photo by Kathleen E. McLaughlin/Pulitzer Center)


An alliance of jihadist groups, including Ansar Dine, the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, and al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, have retaken Timbuktu and again threaten the area of the upper Niger and Senegal Rivers, where the French once built stone fortresses to fend off Umar’s attacks. The forts are still there, long abandoned and crumbling along the riverbanks. Over the past 10 months, jihadist forces have re-established the rule of Islamic law across northern Mali, which encompasses around 200,000 square miles or 60 percent of the country. This is a place where teenage couples risk death by stoning if they hold hands in public.

Mali: Al Qaeda Country | Pulitzer Center
(Photo from Pulitzer Center)

An alliance of jihadist groups, including Ansar Dine, the Movement for Oneness and Jihad in West Africa, and al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, have retaken Timbuktu and again threaten the area of the upper Niger and Senegal Rivers, where the French once built stone fortresses to fend off Umar’s attacks. The forts are still there, long abandoned and crumbling along the riverbanks. Over the past 10 months, jihadist forces have re-established the rule of Islamic law across northern Mali, which encompasses around 200,000 square miles or 60 percent of the country. This is a place where teenage couples risk death by stoning if they hold hands in public.

Mali: Al Qaeda Country | Pulitzer Center

(Photo from Pulitzer Center)


Award-winning investigative reporter Ahmet Sik is no stranger to danger. In 1998, he was hospitalized after a pro-police mob, furious about a murder conviction against several cops in a torture case, attacked the victim’s lawyers, the prosecutor, and journalists. In 2009, he fled the country for a year, fearing officials who had been targets of his reporting. Short, muscular, and brutally blunt, Sik has a spent a career working on mainstream and leftist newspapers, digging into human-rights abuses and questionable government operations.
So when word leaked out in Turkish newspapers last year that he was the target of a government investigation, he knew the routine: He was being set up.
Where truth is a hard cell : CJR
(Photo by Stephen Franklin/Pulitzer Center)

Award-winning investigative reporter Ahmet Sik is no stranger to danger. In 1998, he was hospitalized after a pro-police mob, furious about a murder conviction against several cops in a torture case, attacked the victim’s lawyers, the prosecutor, and journalists. In 2009, he fled the country for a year, fearing officials who had been targets of his reporting. Short, muscular, and brutally blunt, Sik has a spent a career working on mainstream and leftist newspapers, digging into human-rights abuses and questionable government operations.

So when word leaked out in Turkish newspapers last year that he was the target of a government investigation, he knew the routine: He was being set up.

Where truth is a hard cell : CJR

(Photo by Stephen Franklin/Pulitzer Center)

(Photo by Pulitzer Center)

Bamako, a great sprawl of 2 million people on the Niger River, was in the grip of a gun battle. Soldiers of Mali’s new ruling junta, who wore the green berets of the regular army, had been in power all of five weeks when I arrived there late last April. Now they were fighting a countercoup attempt from the former presidential guard, an elite parachute regiment loyal to President Amadou Toumani Touré, the democratically elected leader who was deposed by junior army officers last March, when he had been weeks from retirement and elections to replace him. But by the time his guard — distinguished from other army units by its members’ bright red berets — made a move, he’d exiled himself to Senegal. They fought on without him.

Mali: Rebel Country | Pulitzer Center

(Photo by Pulitzer Center)

Bamako, a great sprawl of 2 million people on the Niger River, was in the grip of a gun battle. Soldiers of Mali’s new ruling junta, who wore the green berets of the regular army, had been in power all of five weeks when I arrived there late last April. Now they were fighting a countercoup attempt from the former presidential guard, an elite parachute regiment loyal to President Amadou Toumani Touré, the democratically elected leader who was deposed by junior army officers last March, when he had been weeks from retirement and elections to replace him. But by the time his guard — distinguished from other army units by its members’ bright red berets — made a move, he’d exiled himself to Senegal. They fought on without him.

Mali: Rebel Country | Pulitzer Center

(Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

A spokeswoman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said accusations about bad Chinese drugs in Africa are unfounded, according to the Xinhua news agency. Xinhua wrote: “Cooperation between the Chinese government and African countries has played an important role in improving the healthcare environment for people in Africa.”

China Denies Role in Counterfeit Drugs | Pulitzer Center

(Photo from Wikimedia Commons)

A spokeswoman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs said accusations about bad Chinese drugs in Africa are unfounded, according to the Xinhua news agency. Xinhua wrote: “Cooperation between the Chinese government and African countries has played an important role in improving the healthcare environment for people in Africa.”

China Denies Role in Counterfeit Drugs | Pulitzer Center

(Photo by Jason Berry/Pulitzer Center)

As the Vatican lowers a curtain of scrutiny across communities of religious women in America, a small but resonant chorus of critics is raising an issue of a hypocrisy that has grown too blatant to ignore. The same hierarchy that brought shame upon the Vatican for recycling clergy child molesters, a scandal that rocked the church in many countries, has assumed a moral high ground in punishing the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, a group whose members have put their lives on the line in taking the social justice agenda of the Second Vatican Council to some of the poorest areas in the world.

Bishops investigating US nuns carry poor records on sex abuse cases

(Photo by Jason Berry/Pulitzer Center)

As the Vatican lowers a curtain of scrutiny across communities of religious women in America, a small but resonant chorus of critics is raising an issue of a hypocrisy that has grown too blatant to ignore. The same hierarchy that brought shame upon the Vatican for recycling clergy child molesters, a scandal that rocked the church in many countries, has assumed a moral high ground in punishing the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, a group whose members have put their lives on the line in taking the social justice agenda of the Second Vatican Council to some of the poorest areas in the world.

Bishops investigating US nuns carry poor records on sex abuse cases

pulitzercenter:

“But as analog and offline as paper might be, it doesn’t lack for high stakes. The globalization of the pulp and paper industry, a phenomenon of the past decade, has heightened U.S.-China trade frictions, infuriated environmentalists and cast America’s global competitiveness and innovation in a new light.”

- Pulitzer Center grantee John Schmid in an Untold Story for the Pulitzer Center, as part of a larger series on Wisconsin and China’s paper industry in collaboration with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

pulitzercenter:

Cancer is often considered a disease of affluence, but about 70 percent of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Explore this interactive map to learn about cancers that disproportionately affect poorer countries.

The map accompanies the radio and special online series, produced by PRI’s The World in collaboration with the Pulitzer Center. In Joanne Silberner’s five-part series we meet patients, doctors, and public health advocates on the front lines—and explore the political, cultural, and logistical obstacles that make tackling cancer so difficult across most of the globe.