Jody Michael
After the decade-long, $6-trillion debacle in Iraq, you’d think Congress and pundits would be pressing the Obama administration for figures: If the U.S. fights ISIS in Iraq and Syria, what would be the odds of victory? How much would it cost? How many U.S. troops would be killed? How would it effect nearby countries like Iran? And how much of a threat does ISIS actually pose to the U.S. “homeland”?

Whites view armed agents of the government as their allies, while African-Americans see those same agents as enemies arrayed against them, like the occupying army of a hostile power.

Why would blacks view things this way?

Maybe it’s the poisonous, humiliating, and violent ways that (often white) cops interact with blacks in inner-city neighborhoods.

Maybe it’s the long history of white Americans tolerating (and encouraging) the creation of impoverished African-American ghettos.

Maybe it’s the willingness of white Americans to allow so many black children to languish in underfunded, crumbling, rat- and roach-infested public schools.

Maybe it’s the countless times black men are subjected to search, detention, arrest, and other humiliations simply because they “fit the description” of a criminal — or are merely “driving while black” through an upper-class, mostly white neighborhood.

Maybe it’s the lack of outrage among whites when they hear (if they hear) that a white police officer has shot an unarmed black boy or man in a blighted neighborhood most whites will never see or experience firsthand.

Maybe it’s the distinctive form of indifference expressed by people like David Goad, a 64-year-old white man who lives near Ferguson and tells The New York Times with regard to the protests, “They always want to stir up trouble, the blacks… I grew up around blacks, so I know how they are.”

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart discuss Fox News’s coverage of Ferguson, Missouri.

comedycentral:

Click here to watch Jon Stewart discuss Fox News’s coverage of Ferguson, Missouri.


I have no doubt about Fey: She burst the bubble that was Sarah Palin. Palin dug her own grave, but Fey’s sketches — underlined by her uncanny resemblance to the Alaska governor — had the sharpest edge of purposeful satire to them. This wasn’t the kind of chummy goofiness that could leave the real Palin and Fey golfing buddies. In fact, when Palin did her requisite (cynical) SNL cameo to prove she could laugh at herself, Fey refused to share the stage, appearing with Lorne Michaels to avoid any hint of endorsement. You might not immediately see it with Fey’s pitch-perfect parody of Palin’s Katie Couric interview. But it’s there. When Fey’s Palin found her contrast with Amy Poehler’s Hillary, the underlying outrage becomes apparent: How could Sarah Palin come closer to the Oval Office than Hillary Clinton? Beneath the surface mockery of faux-folksiness, Fey had an agenda: Get this person off the political stage. And if any comedian has ever had any real impact on politics, it has to be Tina Fey.

And Now, Ladies and Gentlemen, a Message From the ‘Saturday Night Live’ President of the United States, by John Lopez of Grantland

I have no doubt about Fey: She burst the bubble that was Sarah Palin. Palin dug her own grave, but Fey’s sketches — underlined by her uncanny resemblance to the Alaska governor — had the sharpest edge of purposeful satire to them. This wasn’t the kind of chummy goofiness that could leave the real Palin and Fey golfing buddies. In fact, when Palin did her requisite (cynical) SNL cameo to prove she could laugh at herself, Fey refused to share the stage, appearing with Lorne Michaels to avoid any hint of endorsement. You might not immediately see it with Fey’s pitch-perfect parody of Palin’s Katie Couric interview. But it’s there. When Fey’s Palin found her contrast with Amy Poehler’s Hillary, the underlying outrage becomes apparent: How could Sarah Palin come closer to the Oval Office than Hillary Clinton? Beneath the surface mockery of faux-folksiness, Fey had an agenda: Get this person off the political stage. And if any comedian has ever had any real impact on politics, it has to be Tina Fey.

And Now, Ladies and Gentlemen, a Message From the ‘Saturday Night Live’ President of the United States, by John Lopez of Grantland